Tag Archive | Seasonal Hymns

HYMNS FOR ALL SEASONS – It’s finished!

After almost two years of researching, organizing, writing, editing, revising, and then repeating the whole process over again, and again, finally HYMNS FOR ALL SEASONS: Talking with God Through Music has been published.

What’s in it? Reflections on 110 hymns: Who wrote the hymn? When? Why? What impact has the hymn had? Any other details that fascinated me as I did my research. The book includes:

  • 12 Advent Carols
  • 21 Christmas Carols
  • 9 Epiphany Carols
  • 10 Hymns for Lent
  • 16 Hymns for Holy Week
  • 10 Hymns for Easter
  • 11 Hymns for Pentecost
  • 7 Hymns for the Summer Holidays (Patriotic Hymns)
  • 3 Hymns for All Saints Day
  • 5 Hymns for Christ the King Sunday
  • 6 Hymns for Thanksgiving

Plus, a few comments on a handful of related hymns. All together, including the front pages and the index, it adds up to 250 pages. Twice as long as my last book – HYMNS OF PEACE AND COMFORT, and four times as long as my first book in this series – REFLECTIONS ON MY FAVORITE PSALM-BASED HYMNS. I think this will be my last book in the Talking with God through Music series.

How did I select the hymns to include? First I made up a list of all my favorite hymns related to any holiday from January through December (actually starting with December and ending with November). Then I supplemented my personal favorites by scanning through a few church hymnals – Methodist, Presbyterian, Lutheran, Baptist, Pentecostal, and hymnals from non-denominational publishers, and I added a few more of my favorites that I remembered when I saw them in these hymnals.

How did I know all these hymns, and why did I want to write about them anyway? Although I wasn’t born with knowledge about hymns, I began to acquire it very early in life. I grew up attending Willerup Methodist Church in Cambridge, Wisconsin once or twice every week from the time I was just weeks old. Willerup was known as a singing church. On Sunday mornings, we sang 3 or 4 hymns, and listened to the choir sing 2 anthems. On Sunday evenings, we began the service with about 15 minutes of singing gospel songs. The minister would get us started by announcing the page number of the song he wanted us to sing. After we sang the first song, the minister would ask for requests. He never had to wait long for a response. Often the person making the request would explain why that song was particularly meaningful for them at that time, a “testimony” of sorts. This Sunday night custom planted in my mind the idea that the songs we sang were personally meaningful, and maybe we could actually talk with God by singing these songs.

I grew up learning, thinking about, and loving hundreds of hymns. That’s what I wanted to share by writing this book. Maybe some readers will be able to talk with God through these hymns, too.

How did I find the stories behind the hymns? A few of the stories are personal memories that come from more than 70 years of hearing, singing, and playing these hymns. Over the years I’ve acquired about a dozen books of hymn stories. These books were good starting points in my research. But the biggest resource for most of my research was GOOGLE. This online search tool led me to hundreds of resources. I would google the title of a hymn along with the words “hymn history” and obtain dozens of web addresses for me to look up on the Internet. I quickly learned that the most useful online resources were:

Hymnary.org is probably the most massive online resource of everything about hymns you can imagine. Located at Calvin University in Grand Rapids, Michigan, Hymnary.org has a staff of 14 subject matter and technical experts plus student interns documenting information about hymns. They collaborate with The Hymn Society in the United States and Canada, and an editorial board made up of professors, composers, and authors representing many different denominations and styles of music.

UMCdiscipleship.org (Discipleship Ministries of The United Methodist Church) doesn’t include as many hymns on their website, but if they have a hymn, it’s usually my favorite source for insights into the hymn. Frequently, the author of these articles is C. Michael Hawn, Director of the Sacred Music Program at Perkins School of Theology at Southern Methodist University. I almost feel like I know Michael because we were classmates together at Wheaton College more than 50 years ago.

Wikipedia.com is a good online encyclopedia for discovering interesting information about anything. Although not always considered the most reliable source itself, Wikipedia.com can provide leads to other resources. Sometimes, looking up a composer or an author leads to information about what prompted the writing of a particular hymn.

Research from these three websites, along with dozens of other websites that Google guided me to, convinced me that every single hymn has an interesting story behind it just waiting to be discovered.

What’s next? First, I’d like to sell some of these books. That’s why I wrote the book – to share how hymns can help us talk with God, and simply to share some fascinating stories behind hymns. (I’ll explain how to buy a book later in this blog post.)

Then, I’ll probably start posting to this blog a little more often. I’m not ready to go back to weekly posts, but I hope to write once or twice a month about something that’s on my mind. I’ve missed doing that kind of writing over the last couple years.

At this point, I have no plans to start writing another book. Plans may change. If they do, I’ll let you all know about it on this blog.

Book Purchase Information. Since retiring, I’ve simplified my online presence. That means I no longer have an easy method to sell books online. If you would like to buy my newest book, HYMNS FOR ALL SEASONS: Talking with God through Music, please email me at MarianKorth@gmail.com and specify the number of books you would like to order (Christmas is right around the corner),/ and your mailing address. I will send the book(s) to you along with an invoice. The price of the book is $20.00. (I’ll cover the sales tax.) Shipping and handling for one book is $5.00. If you order more than one book, I’ll adjust the shipping charge accordingly. If you are local and would like to pick up the book(s) to avoid shipping charges, please specify that in your email, as well.

If you have any questions, please call me at 608-212-6197.

P.S. In the course of all the research I conducted to learn the stories behind these hymns, I also learned a lot of interesting trivia, some of which I included in the hymn stories. In this book, you will learn:

  • What well-known Thanksgiving hymn was written to be used as a table grace about 400 years ago, during The Thirty Years War and The Plague?
  • What Advent carol was written during the time of the Roman Empire by a Spanish lawyer who was trying to build a case for Jesus actually being God, not just a human being?
  • What popular Christmas carol was written by an atheist?
  • What Epiphany carol was written by an Episcopal priest in Pennsylvania as a Christmas present for his nieces and nephews?
  • What Easter hymn was written in response to the assassination of the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.?
  • What patriotic hymn was written to replace the bawdy words of a popular marching song during the Civil War?

“Now Thank We All Our God”

I’m almost done writing the first draft of my next book. My first two books in this series about the stories behind hymns were focused on hymns on a particular theme. My first book was a small book about the stories of 31 hymns that were based on the Psalms. My second book had 51 stories about hymns based on the theme of peace and comfort.

My current book is about seasonal hymns – the stories behind hymns written to celebrate the seasons of the church year from Advent and Christmas, through Easter and Pentecost, and ending with Christ the King Sunday. I’m also including hymns written to celebrate national holidays, like Thanksgiving. Of the 120 hymn stories in this book, I just finished drafting the story of the 114th hymn, “Now Thank We All Our God.”

The pandemic has provided me an atmosphere that’s very conducive to writing. If I’m supposed to stay at home and avoid seeing people I don’t live with, sitting at my computer to research the history of hymns is the perfect thing to do. I started writing this book in March. I’ll admit, it was a little hard to focus on Advent hymns during Lent, and Lenten hymns during the beautiful sunny days of summer. I’m finally caught up, and am now in sync. I’m writing about Thanksgiving hymns just in time for Thanksgiving.

Which leads me into why I’m writing this blog post today. Not only is “Now Thank We All Our God” a hymn of thankfulness that is appropriate for this time of year, the hymn was written in 1636, during the peak of the plague that spread throughout Europe – a time we can somewhat identify with this year, the year of our own pandemic. Because the parallels between 1636 and 2020 are so notable, I decided to share the story on my blog.


“NOW THANK WE ALL OUR GOD”

I’m writing this on Sunday, November 15, 2020, less than two weeks before Thanksgiving. This is the year of the Corona Virus, COVID-19. Public Health officials are urging us to stay home for Thanksgiving – to NOT gather with friends and family. The risk of spreading the virus is too great. It’s easy to feel disappointed or depressed by the havoc the virus has wreaked on our country and the whole world this year. This Thanksgiving is not a time that many of us are inclined to feel very thankful.

Almost 400 years ago, the world was in a similar predicament. The Thirty Years War was raging and the plague was spreading throughout Europe. In 1636 Martin Rinkart, a Lutheran pastor in the walled city of Eilenburg, Germany, wrote the hymn, “Now Thank We All Our God.” Throughout the Thirty Years War, Eilenburg, as a walled city, was flooded with refugees seeking safety. That resulted in overcrowding, widespread hunger, and disease. Also, the city was sacked three times during the war, once by the Austrian Army and twice by the Swedish Army.

By the mid 1630s, Rinkart was the only pastor still alive in the city, and he was left with the task of officiating at the funerals of everyone who died – sometimes as many as 50 funerals in a day. One was for his wife.

Despite this horrible situation, Rinkart regularly invited refugees into his home for meals, even though he barely had enough food for his own family. He wrote “Now Thank We All Our God” as a prayer to be sung before a meal. The first verse expresses gratitude to God for his “countless gifts of love.” The second verse is a petition for God’s continued care. The last verse praises God the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit – “the one eternal God.”

During his ministry, Rinkart wrote 65 other hymns, but this is the one that is still in wide use. Even today it is one of the most frequently sung hymns in German churches.

In the 1850s, Catherine Winkworth, an English hymn writer and educator traveled in Germany and became very interested in German hymns. She selected about 400 German hymns, translated them into English, and published four hymn books of German hymns in English. She is the person who brought “Now Thank We All Our God” to the English-speaking world.

This year may be the perfect year to sing or read “Now Thank We All Our God” before we eat our Thanksgiving dinner, just as the author intended it to be sung – as a prayer before a meal.

Now thank we all our God with hearts and hands and voices,
who wondrous things has done, in whom this world rejoices;
who, from our mothers’ arms, has blest us on our way
with countless gifts of love, and still is ours today.

Oh, may this bounteous God through all our life be near us,
with ever joyful hearts and blessed peace to cheer us,

and keep us all in grace, and guide us when perplexed,
and free us from all harm in this world and the next.

All praise and thanks to God the Father now be given,
the Son, and Spirit blest, who reign in highest heaven,
and one eternal God, whom earth and heaven adore;
for thus it was, is now, and shall be evermore.

What I’ve been doing during the pandemic

For the past seven months I’ve had lots of quiet time at home – the perfect environment for writing. I’ve set aside this blog, mostly, to concentrate on my latest book – Talking with God through Music: Seasonal Hymns. Right now I’m on page 186 of the first draft. I think I have about 50 pages left to go. I’ve had quite a productive few days of writing, so I decided to take a quick break from the book today to blog about how much fun I had this week while working on the book.

Right now I’m on the last page of the chapter devoted to reflections on hymns about Pentecost. Compared to other major church holidays, like Christmas and Easter, not many hymns have been written for Pentecost – the day the Holy Spirit came to fill Jesus’ followers with God’s presence – the day often considered the birthday of the church. I came up with a list of twelve hymns I wanted to include in this chapter. After doing my research, I ended up with nine hymns in the chapter.

My process for researching a hymn to determine if there is a special story associated with the hymn is:

  1. Find the hymn in multiple hymnals, and compare versions.
  2. Google the hymn title along with the words “hymn history” and other relevant key words.
  3. Match up the “Internet facts” with my personal associations with the hymn.
  4. Put together a story about how the hymn helps us “talk with God,” or I decide not to include the hymn in the book.

One of the hymns I wanted to include in the Pentecost chapter was “Where the Spirit of the Lord Is.” Even though some people may call it just a “chorus” rather than a “hymn” because it has only one verse and is rather short, I think of it as a very meaningful hymn. 

When I was part-time organist at the Presbyterian Church in Cambridge, there was a small choir that sang once or twice a month. I usually selected a short hymn for the choir to sing at the opening of the service to draw the congregation into an atmosphere of quietness, to sense that we were all together in the presence of God. The choir often sang this hymn.

Where the Spirit of the Lord is, 
there is peace;
Where the Spirit of the Lord is,
there is love.
There is comfort in life’s darkest hour;
There is light and life,
there is help and power
In the Spirit, in the Spirit of the Lord.

I did my usual research to find some story about the hymn that would be inspirational to write about for my book. I googled “Where the Spirit of the Lord Is hymn history,” but the only information that popped up was the name of the composer, Stephen R. Adams. I googled his name along with several other words, but found nothing. I really wanted to include this hymn, but I was coming up with nothing. After a few hours of searching, I was just about ready to give up. I googled one last combination of his name and some words – I don’t remember exactly what they were – and I scrolled down a few pages and found a story written by Adams’ son, Craig Adams, about his father and another hymn he had written, “Peace in the Midst of the Storm.” That was it! The perfect story to illustrate how the Holy Spirit works in our lives, just as described in a song Adams had written the year before, “Where the Spirit of the Lord is.” Here’s the page I wrote about this hymn for my book.

——————————————-

STEPHEN R. ADAMS GREW UP IN NEW ENGLAND, the son of a Nazarene pastor. He started to study music when he was seven. Ten years later he became the organist of his father’s church. Shortly afterwards, his family moved to the Midwest. He continued to serve as a church organist while he went to college at Indiana University, where he studied Greek philosophy and English literature. He later settled in Ohio and served as a church organist, choir director, and hymn writer.

Adams’ most popular hymn is “Where the Spirit of the Lord Is.” It has just one verse, but the words tell us a lot about what the Holy Spirit does for us. “Where the Spirit of the Lord is – 

… there is peace … there is love.
There is comfort in life’s darkest hour;
There is light and life,
There is help and power …

Adams wrote this hymn in 1973. The next year, Adams was serving as the worship pastor for Xenia First Church of the Nazarene in Xenia, Ohio. About mid-morning on April 3, 1974, one of the largest tornadoes in history charged through the town of Xenia, carving out a mile-wide path of destruction. Adams happened to be inside a furniture store, just down the street from the church, when it happened. He was buried alive beneath the rubble of the furniture store. Adams’ son, Craig Adams, described what happened:

Trapped in a pitch-black cavern of panic and isolation, Dad cried out to God, fearing death. He recounts that, miraculously, God met him in a supernatural way and brought the most unthinkable and powerful peace he had ever known. His darkest moment was filled with the brightest hope.

Adams didn’t have the strength to lift up the concrete and steel surrounding him, but he was able to pull chunks of rubble toward him until he was able to create a hole large enough for him to escape. Once outside, Adams walked up the street to see what remained of the church where he had been just moments before the tornado hit. Only a few partial walls remained standing. A few days later, Adams and his pastor walked over to the former furniture store and learned that everyone else that had been in the store during the tornado had died. His pastor told him, “God doesn’t promise to take us out of the storms of life. He does promise, however, that he will be right in the middle of them with us.”

That’s what this hymn tells us – “Where the Spirit of the Lord is there is peace… love… comfort… light and life… help and power…”

——————-

Even during a pandemic, the Spirit of the Lord is with us. And, “Where the Spirit of the Lord is there is peace… love… comfort… light and life… help and power…”

“This Little Light of Mine” and a Home Town Protest

Well, it happened again. I turned up too much information, and I need to share it somewhere. It’s too much for the book I’m writing, so I guess it needs to go into another blog post, just like the last time this happened, when I wrote about “It Came upon the Midnight Clear.” This time the song is “This Little Light of Mine.”

I’m still spending most of my days working on my newest book, Talking with God through Music: Seasonal Hymns. So far I’ve written hymn reflections on 12 hymns for Advent, 21 for Christmas, and 9 for Epiphany. “This Little Light of Mine” is my last song for Epiphany. Then I can move on to Lent, Holy Week, and Easter. Eventually I’ll get to the patriotic hymns of summer, hopefully while it’s still summer. My goal is to complete the book before the end of the year, and to have written reflections on about 100 seasonal hymns.

But as I said above, I learned a lot about “This Little Light of Mine,” and I want to tell you about it.

According to the National Public Radio (NPR) series, “National Anthem,” produced in 2018, 

Fans know “This Little Light of Mine” as a beloved children’s tune, recognized around the world. But it’s also a spiritual, which was transformed by the nation’s civil rights movement into an anthem of singular power.

In the 1960s, during demonstrations for civil rights, the singing of “This Little Light of Mine” helped to steady the nerves of protestors while angry police officers threatened to beat them up. Freedom singer Rutha Mae Harris recalled, “Music was an anchor. It kept us from being afraid. ‘Everywhere I go, Lord, I’m gonna let it shine…’”

Fifty years later, in 2017, the song was still having the same impact. Reverend Osagyefo Sekou used “This Little Light of Mine” to defuse tensions during a counter-protest before a crowd of white supremacists and alt-right supporters gathered for the “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.

“We had originally said we were going to stand silently,” says Rev. Sekou, a recording artist, author, theologian and activist who helped train volunteers at the counter-protest. “But the Nazis were marching past us in these various battalions, cursing and yelling – mostly homophobic slurs – at us. And you could feel the energy of the people who weren’t with us… [They] were getting amped up.” 

Sekou says he knew, in that moment, he had to change the atmosphere. “I know song can do that. So I just broke into ‘This Little Light of Mine.’”

In a moment captured on video, the clergy and volunteers … are shown standing in a line, their voices rising over the chants of “You will not replace us” from the rally crowd. “The tensions went down … and it shook the Nazis,” Sekou says. “They didn’t know what to do with all that joy. We weren’t going to let the darkness have the last word.”

There’s another story about another movement for justice and the role “This Little Light of Mine” played. This story is from “Sojourners” magazine, December 13, 2013. 

Two years before Occupy Wall Street demanded economic reform at the national level, … hundreds of protestors marched on Bank of America and Wachovia in the fall of 2009. In the midst of the subprime mortgage crisis, with people facing ballooning interest rates and foreclosures on their homes, organizers delivered a theological statement against what they called “usury” – the Old Testament sin of collecting interest from the poor. 

“This little light of mine, I’m gonna let it shine!” sang 70 customers inside the cavernous lobby at BOA headquarters. “Even in my bank, I’m gonna let it shine!” they sang, marching seven times along the gleaming glass and polished marble walls…. 

The writer of this Sojourners’ article ended the story saying,

I hadn’t known this little light might shine through simple acts of justice: sitting on a bus, ordering coffee at a lunch counter, or transferring your money to a credit union built for people, not profits. I didn’t know all these little flames, brought together in a simple Sunday School song reverberating around an office building, could enflesh the presence of God, even if they weren’t hot enough or bright enough to right the wrongs, nor turn oppression into justice nor usher in the kingdom of God. I didn’t know it could be enough just to catch a glimpse of that kingdom, wherever two or three were gathered in Christ’s name….  I didn’t know this little light might actually free people, here on earth, not completely, but at least give them a bit more freedom from things like debt, or hunger, or poverty, or violence, or loneliness…. 

 

And then there’s a story I personally experienced just a couple weeks ago. But we didn’t sing “This Little Light of Mine.” About a hundred people gathered at Veterans Park in downtown Cambridge, Wisconsin, population less than 2,000, to support the Black Lives Matter movement. According to the 2010 census, the population of Cambridge is 96.8% White, 0.9% African American, and 1.7% Latino. We’re a typical small town of the Midwest. And although racial injustice doesn’t touch us very directly in our everyday lives, we do recognize injustice when we see it, and at least a hundred of us, probably many more, want to do what we can to bring about justice. What we did in the park that evening was listen to a couple speakers, hold “Black Lives Matter” signs, meet some of our neighbors who share our same concerns for justice, stand together in silence for 8 minutes and 46 seconds, and pray together, led by one of our local pastors. 

If we hold another demonstration in the future, I hope we sing “This Little Light of Mine” as so many other freedom protesters have done in the past. Why do I care so much about singing this song?

Although most people know “This Little Light of Mine” as a Sunday School song or as a Freedom song for peaceful protests, it is definitely a song that belongs in the Epiphany chapter of my book, as well. The word “epiphany” means “appearance or manifestation.” Epiphany as a church holiday refers to January 6, the twelfth day of Christmas, and it commemorates the Wise Men finding the Christ Child and bringing him gifts. This is considered the first manifestation of Christ to Gentiles. Probably the most well-known Epiphany carol is “We Three Kings of Orient Are.” 

But the Epiphany season is about much more than the Wise Men’s journey to find Jesus. It’s about other ways God has given us an “epiphany” – an “aha!” moment – about the nature of God and our relationship to God’s world. A common theme of Epiphany is light. It is with light, that truth is revealed to us. That’s why we sing “Jesus, the Light of the World,” another Epiphany carol. And Jesus told his disciples to be the light of the world, as well. “You are the light of the world. A city that is set on a hill cannot be hidden. Nor do they light a lamp and put it under a basket, but on a lamp stand, and it gives light to all who are in the house. Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works and glorify your father in heaven.” (Matthew 5:14-16, New King James Version

This little light of mine, I’m gonna let it shine!  [sing 3 times]
Let it shine!   [sing 3 times]

Shine all over Cambridge, I’m gonna let it shine! [sing 3 times]
Let it shine! [sing 3 times]

That’s the song. Regardless of who is singing it, and for whatever purpose, the first verse is always the same. The simple pattern of the first verse can easily be filled in with new words to fit any justice issue – to shed a light on whatever injustice needs to be illuminated – racial injustice, economic injustice, gender injustice, and so on.

As the writer of the Sojourner’s article explained,

I hadn’t known this little light might shine through simple acts of justice… I didn’t know all these little flames, brought together in a simple Sunday School song … could enflesh the presence of God…

“It Came upon the Midnight Clear”

I’m having the time of my life during this “Safer at Home” interlude in our lives. I average about eight hours a day on writing my newest book, Talking with God through Music: Seasonal Hymns. I’ve written a dozen reflections on Advent carols, and thirteen reflections on Christmas carols, with eight more to go. Then there are ten more to write for Epiphany before I can move on to Lent and Easter. Eventually, I’ll get through the whole year of seasonal music. Meanwhile, I’m reliving Christmas these days. 

After I research and write each reflection for the book, I give it to Mim for feedback to be sure the text flows well enough to make sense to her. Yesterday I finished writing about “It Came upon the Midnight Clear,” and gave it to Mim to read. She approved. But then I told her about my frustration of having to leave out so much information that I had gathered. I didn’t have room to include it all if I wanted to stick to the format of having just one page for each reflection. When I told her about all the interesting facts I was leaving out, she said, “Why don’t you write a blog post about it so you can include everything you want.” So that’s what this is – my extended reflection on the Christmas Carol, “It Came upon the Midnight Clear.” 

As we’re experiencing a colder than usual spring these days, imagine yourself back in the Christmas season, singing the carol, “It Came upon the Midnight Clear.”

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Tune Name:   CAROL
Composer:      Richard Storrs Willis 
(1819-1900) American composer and organist.
Author:            Edmund H. Sears (1810-1876) Unitarian minister.
Scripture:        Luke 2:13-14  
And suddenly there was with the angel a multitude of the heavenly host praising God and saying: “Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, goodwill toward men.

 

angelbending

Edmund Sears grew up on a farm in western Massachusetts, near the Berkshire Mountains. He once told a friend that as a child he imagined that the hilltops touched heaven and that angels rested on the hilltops between heaven and earth on their errands for God. 

His parents taught him and his two brothers the importance of moral values, and they encouraged them to study – once the farm work was done. He graduated from Union College in New York, and worked briefly as a lawyer and a teacher, but soon went to Harvard Divinity School to become a Unitarian minister, graduating in 1837, at age 27. 

The American Unitarian Association supported his work as a missionary in the frontier area around Toledo, Ohio for about a year. Then he returned to Massachusetts, where he accepted a position as pastor of a small Unitarian church in the town of Wayland. Meanwhile, he got married, and by the time his family grew to include four children, he realized he needed a larger church that could support his whole family. He accepted a call to a church in Lancaster, Massachusetts and served there for seven years. 

The mid-1800s were stressful times in the United States. Americans were dealing with the affects of the Industrial Revolution, the Mexican-American War, the California Gold Rush, and the issue of slavery. The social disruption resulting from all these factors put a lot of pressure on Sears as the pastor of a large congregation, where he was trying to provide both leadership and personal support to the members. Sears had a breakdown and retreated back to the small town of Wayland to recover. 

While recovering, Sears wrote the poem “It Came upon the Midnight Clear.” This poem is focused on two ideas: first, the angels that appeared on the night of Christ’s birth to announce, “Peace on Earth, goodwill toward men!” and second, the dismal condition of the world in his day (and still today as we sing the song). The third stanza (often omitted from today’s hymnals) emphasizes the “woes of sin and strife the world has suffered long.” The last stanza reassures us that the time of peace will come eventually as the prophets foretold. 

This carol has been controversial throughout its history. It may be the only Christmas carol that doesn’t even mention the birth of Christ. Since Sears was known to be a Unitarian, many religious conservatives claimed this carol proved his lack of belief that Christ is truly divine, and therefore the hymn should be removed from hymnals. Other churches rewrote parts of the carol to bring the birth of Christ into it. Because this hymn focused on the awful conditions on earth to contrast the angels’ message of “Peace on Earth,” this hymn is often considered one of the earliest hymns of the social gospel movement.

A year after writing this poem, Sears had recovered enough to accept a call back to the small church in Wayland to serve again as their part-time pastor. He also went back to writing extensively. He was quite outspoken about equal rights for men and women, and for the abolition of slavery. After the Fugitive Slave Law was passed, Sears declared from the pulpit that “when the human and Divine law were in conflict it was the duty of all to obey the latter.” In 1856, Sears preached a sermon entitled “Discourse” in which he not only condemned slavery as evil, but he directly condemned slave owners, as well. The sermon was considered such a strong argument against slavery that the Massachusetts Abolitionists printed it as a pamphlet to be widely distributed.

How the music for “It Came upon the Midnight Clear” became associated with the text is a mystery. Shortly after the poem was written, Richard Storrs Willis composed a musical exercise, “Study No. 23” in his “Church Chorals and Choir Studies.” Willis later wrote in a letter to a friend, “On my return from Europe in [1876], I found that it (the tune) had been incorporated into various church collections apparently to Edmund Sears’ text.” No one knows who is responsible, or in what circumstances, the poem and the tune were joined together. However, the pairing has lasted for more than a hundred years, and it has become one of our favorite Christmas carols.

Imagine a choir of angels resting on the hilltops of the Berkshires as they return to heaven after their appearance on Earth for Christ’s birth. Perhaps with that image in mind, Sears wrote “It Came upon the Midnight Clear.” As he pondered the angels’ message, and thought about all the anguish we’re still suffering down here, he wrote five stanzas. One of the most relevant stanzas to us today is seldom sung:

But with the woes of sin and strife the world has suffered long;
Beneath the heavenly hymn have rolled two thousand years of wrong;
And we, at war with earth, hear not the tidings, which they bring:
O hush the noise, and cease the strife, and hear the angels sing!

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